An Entrepreneur in the Making

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An Entrepreneur in the Making

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When I was in sixth and seventh grade, I got in trouble for selling candy, food, even tools on school grounds.  Sometimes there is a reason why selling is banned and why people do it. Kids may do it to get money for something they desire, while teachers, principals and teachers may ban it because it gets out of hand.  

I did it for the love of selling.  Eventually I got in trouble and was told that selling items on school grounds is not allowed. 

Still, I loved that I sold things people wanted, and it made me feel good.  I also loved the cash I was making. It showed how responsible I was and how I was maturing.  Of course, all things come to an end, but I loved selling candy to friends in school. Eventually people took me seriously and wanted what I had.  There was a price, and they continued to buy it again and again.  

I wish I could have continued with my business, but I don’t want to get in trouble for breaking and vending rules.  I want to just make money and save it up before I go to college or buy my own house. There is a long way to go, but if I can be persistent, I’m sure I will succeed.  As I look to the future, I can see myself coming up with a brand of toys to start making money on my own.

When it’s done legally, kids should be allowed to sell their own items and run a business. If we are responsible, it will work.  If we learn how to do it in school, we can better manage our jobs in real life, including opening a restaurant, deli, or grocery market. 

If some kids are given a chance, they can see the real value of money and even strive for better jobs involving accounting, banking, and other trading/selling related jobs.  Yes, some kids will misuse their power of trading and selling because they are young, but once we learn from the mistakes we make, we can change it and change our attitude and pay attention in and out of school in pursuit of a future successful career.  

Kids are smart, and I’m sure they will do everything in their power not to get in trouble so they can earn a living by selling fidget spinners and candy for their financial desires. Kids need to use their education to learn more about money–how hard it is to get and how easy it is to lose.  Then they can use these skills to get a career in the future.

In summary, all I want is a chance for a head start on managing money.  Add to this the satisfaction of selling my own items in school for money that benefits me, my family, and my desire to help.  I see this as a formula that benefits everyone. Hopefully my dream can become a reality.

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